Cash On Delivery

by Michael Cooney

Performed March 2011
(March 22 - April 2, 2011)
at the Ron Maslin Playhouse
(10 performances: part of the regular season)

Directed by Rosemary Keneford


CAST

ERIC SWAN Brooke Keneford
LINDA SWAN Jenefer Haynes
NORMAN MCDONALD Dwayne Aylward
MR. JENKINS Barry Caiger
UNCLE GEORGE Lionel King
SALLY CHESSINGTON Barbara Kobolak
DOCTOR CHAPMAN Janet Rice
MR. FORBRIGHT Martin Weeden
MS. COWPER Gwen Knight
MISS DIXON Dayna MacDonald

PRODUCTION STAFF

Production Manager Joan Ritchie
Stage Manager Dorothy Beak
Assistant Stage Manager Susan Monaghan
Arlene Watson
Set Design Susan V. Phillips
Set Construction Tony Francis
Earl McLaughlin
Gordon Walt
Construction Assistant Barry Caiger
Barry Forty
Tony Francis
Jim Holmes
Brooke Keneford
Earl McLaughlin
David Newing
Bill Williams
Set Painter Larisa Ackerman
Margrit Cattell
Diane Meharey
Jenni Mousseau
Susan V. Phillips
Jim Ritchie
Ann Williams
Lighting Design Sudarsan Narasimhan
Lighting Assistant Kendrick Abell
Cameron MacDonald
Sound Design Gerry Thompson
Sound Assistant Catriona Malcolmson
Special Effects Roy Ballantine
Continuity Anna Lisa Bloom
Jim Evans
Marguerite Evans
Clare Flockton
Heather Walt
Properties Margrit Cattell
Patrick Kay
Helen Weeden
Furnishings Joan Ritchie
Costumes Kathryn Clarke
Jennifer Crocker
Sue Flockton
Elizabeth Pearson
Dresser Hannah Miller
Make-up Bev Brooks
Make-Up Assistant Linda McGuire
Graace Seguin
Hair Styling Carol Walkey
Green Room Manager Sheryl Bell
Kirsten Ramstead
House Manager Jim Ritchie
Refreshments coordinator Nancy Baker
Whynn Bosnich
Director's Note

The origins of farce are generally accepted to be in French theatre but it came into its own in Britain during the 1920's with the "Aldwych" farces and with writers such as Ray Cooney and John Chapman in the 1970's and 1980's. In Cash on Delivery, Ray Cooney's son Michael has continued this tradition, writing very much in the style of his old man! Farce is often regarded as nothing more than highly improbable plot situations, exaggerated characters, mistaken identities and, of course, lots of slapstick but just like the Monty Python gang with their "Ministry of Silly Walks", the best farces always poke fun at some aspect of the establishment, and in this play it is the British welfare state and its fictitious "Department of Social Security" which is in the crosshairs. Sit back, suspend your disbelief and prepre to laugh!